Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory bowel disease or IBD includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which causes inflammation in the digestive tract. The large intestine (colon) is inflamed in ulcerative colitis, and this involves the inner lining of the colon. In Crohn’s disease the inflammation extends deeper into the intestinal wall.  It is important to note that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is different from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).  Please click on one of the links below for a patient handout.

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic disease that can cause inflammation anywhere from the mouth to the anus anywhere along the lining of the digestive tract. It most commonly affects the small intestine and the colon. It typically involves both the superficial and deep layers of the intestinal wall

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease marked by inflammation of the lining of the colon and rectum. This inflammation causes irritation in the lining of the large intestine which leads to the symptoms of UC. Though UC always affects the lowest part of the large intestine (the rectum), in some patients it can be present throughout the entire colon.

 

Some of the above information obtained from www.patients.gi.org